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EPISODE 38: How to Transition Careers Even During A Rough Economy

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Job Search

How to Write a Captivating Cover Letter

I have been guilty of not applying for jobs because they required a cover letter. And those were jobs I was highly interested in.

Yikes!

I know, coming from me sounds crazy.

But that was the old me, the college graduate who did not know any better.

My honest opinion on cover letters: they add value. And can be a game changer on your candidacy.

BUT…

They should not be a mandatory job application piece.

However, since the majority rules, many of the hiring managers I have worked with in my seven years recruiting love cover letters.

So, we have to learn how to write them.

Because I have to tell you how original it sounds to say “as you can see on my resume”…

We need to step away from writing genetic letters like that, because they do more harm than good.

So with that out of the way, let’s get into the juicy parts.
Your cover letter could be the best chance to impress a potential employer. Besides your LinkedIn profile and your resume.

It may be just one page, but you have only one opportunity to make it count.

This blog post will cover cover letter hacks that are guaranteed to earn you interviews from employers and teach you how to write a cover letter based on the job description.

Tip #1: Be Personal

The cover letter is your opportunity to showcase your personality. Use the cover letter to show why you are a good fit for this job and company, not just what skills you have or experiences that may apply. This also includes making sure the cover letter reflects who you really are and not one that just repeats what is in your resume.

What I mean by being personal is to tell a story, is there something that ties your story to the company’s mission.

Have you had an unusual upbringing, or had an extraordinary career story? Tell us about that (but only share what you feel comfortable with).

If none of those apply you can also just think of something you feel connected to. For example, if I were to apply for NBC Universal, I would probably talk about how The Office is one of my favorite shows because it makes me laugh and it makes great material for my HR training on what not to do in the workplace.

That is a personal story that ties into their product (TV SHOW) and the job that I would be performing (HUMAN RESOURCES).

Tip #2: Keep It Short

Do not exceed one page. Ever. For cover letters, resume cover sheets, and anything that is job-related because it will come off as too wordy, and it can make you look as though you do not know how to be succinct. You should be able to tell your career story in one page. And it can be difficult for recruiters and hiring managers to feel intrigued to read a three page over wordy document.

Many hiring managers do not have time to read through long cover letters, so make it simple for them and get to the meat of what is in your cover letter with a clear introduction paragraph followed by three or four short paragraphs describing details that demonstrate why you are qualified and how you connect to the company.

Tip #3: Keep It Positive

Do not use your cover letter to vent about how you are frustrated with the job market or this and that. Remember, the cover letter is a marketing tool for yourself — it’s an opportunity to show what makes you different from everyone else applying for this position. And how proactive, pleasant to be around, so take responsibility and leave the complaints at the door.

Stay positive!

Tip #4: Be Aware of the Job Description

The cover letter should be tailored to the job description. If you are applying for a position that requires creativity and problem solving, then share your creative work or any problems you were able to solve in past positions.

If there is not much room left on the cover letter, then summarize your cover letter in one sentence that includes the reason you want to work for this company and how you are a good fit.

There is no need to repeat information found on a resume or cover sheet, but it is also not necessary to merely state why someone wants to join the team. We need concise examples that show your skills and experience.

The cover letter should allow readers an inside look at who you are as a team member and how competent you will be at solving the company’s issues. Remember you are the bridge closing the gap between what they need and you can offer.

Hack #5: Include Numbers

This helps cover letter readers quickly scan through it and recognize the strengths of an applicant. It also makes it easier for them to understand why you are qualified, without having to read every single word. What is one number that best illustrates your qualifications? If someone was applying for a position as a social media manager, they might mention their facebook following on their cover letter.

If you are a sales executive, you might want to mention how much revenue you brought in and how specifically you did that (talk about strategies, especial training, etc).

Quantifying your value will always get you far in the job application process.

RAPID FIRED HACKS:

– Share your personality and give a sense of who you are
– Personal stories help illustrate why the applicant is qualified for this position
– A cover letter should be tailored to the job description (so it’s important to read over the job listing) and make your experiences relevant to that.

The cover letter is a document that accompanies your resume to communicate the way you think and what kind of team member you are. It serves as an introduction, highlight reel or trailer, so make it noteworthy and memorable.

The fact that you are here gives you an advantage. You are learning how to write a cover letter that will win you interviews, you are being like 90% of other applicants using the same template they found on the first page of a google search.

A well-written cover letter can increase the success rate for landing interviews with prospective employers.

A winner cover letter should include the following:

  • Name and contact information.
  • A brief introduction about who you are, what your qualifications are (aside from what is in your resume)
  • Why they would be interested in meeting with you for an interview.
  • Specifics of how this position is a good fit for your skills and interests so that companies can see you are also vetting them.

So go out there and write a cover letter that will get you more interviews. This guide will help you tailor your cover letters to each job description BUT you will have a template so you don’t have to start from scratch every time.

This post is all about how to write a cover letter that earns you interviews.

As always let me know your questions below, comment if you have any suggestions aside from the ones I made. Happy job searching and remember you deserve a job you love. So go get ’em.

******
Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Building a LinkedIn Profile That Attracts Recruiters

This post is about how to build a LinkedIn profile that will have recruiters reaching out for job opportunities.

I am sure you have heard of LinkedIn before, if you have not, you are in luck, this post will break down LinkedIn and all its sections so you can build a professional profile that will attack recruiters.

Truth be told, the last two full-time jobs I have had both came from recruiters reaching out to me directly because they were interested in my background.

So, when it comes to attracting employers, LinkedIn is the platform you want to be on. When you apply for a job, chances are you will be asked to provide your URL. AND if they don’t they’ll google your name and the first result that pops up is a LinkedIn profile.

So, I am so excited you are here because it shows you are interested in building out an impressive profile that will get messages in your inbox on a weekly basis.

This post is all about building a LinkedIn profile that attracts recruiters.

Using LinkedIn to build a strong personal brand goes a lot deeper than a profile picture and catchy headline. A profile to be successful is going to require easy-to-implement strategies so that it can stand out from the clutter of other profiles.

The first thing you want to do is to note how you will use LinkedIn, why, and how often. For the average job-seeker, it is best to be active on the platform, not only for when you are ready to find a new job but to network effectively.

A well-branded profile has the following:

  • An engaging and welcoming picture
  • Detailed headline
  • Engaging and descriptive summary
  • Easy ways for people to get in touch with you
  • A background banner

The first thing people look at when landing on your profile is your profile picture AND headline.

PROFILE PICTURE

Did you know that people with profile pictures get 21X more profile views and 9X more connection requests. Source: *LinkedIn Profile Photo Tips*

The good news is that you do not have to get your profile picture taken by a professional, in fact my profile picture was taken on my iphone while propped on a pile of books.

The key to having a good profile picture is the following:

  • Face is front and center of the frame
  • Wear what you would to work
  • Good lighting
  • Have a friendly and welcoming expression

Dimensions: 400(w) x 400(h) pixels, i recommend not using a picture that would require a lot of cropping because LinkedIn is often updating these dimensions.

HEADLINE

The headline appears next to your name when people search you and it sit right below it on your profile. The best headlines are descriptive of what you do AND they contain keywords for SEO.

You should choose keywords that people will be using in the search bar when looking for candidates. Something to consider is that your headline should make a strong first impression and you want it to be memorable.

Feel free to add some personality by putting emojis or something that describes you personally.

If everything else fails make it quick, catchy, and unique. You have a maximum of 220 characters, be sure to add details and VERY important keywords.

PRO TIP: you have limited characters on desktop, but unlimited on mobile. So if you need the speace make edits on your mobile app.

BANNER

You can be creative with your banner and there are a ton of options within the LinkedIn stock photos library, but you can also go to canva and get creative OR even use the banners already created and choose whichever matches your personality.

Dimensions: 1584(w) x 396(h) pixels.

SUMMARY

The summary is nothing more than your story, who you are as a professional and what you do BUT also why you do it.

Here is a great time to show your world your creativity when you are getting ready to describe who you are.

Steer away from genetic and overused cliches, the top tip I have is to use an enticing opener that will get people excited or curious enough to want to read the rest of your summary.

You have to tell a story of who you are and what your personal brand stands for. AND write in the first person, it is best to be less formal here and writing in the first person also helps with relatability.

You can use this space to sprinkle some SEO friendly keywords about the areas, industries and jobs you’d like to be considered for. The Summary section is used in searches on LinkedIn so take it to your advantage and make it easier for people to find you.

There is a character limit for your summary on LinkedIn, you can add up to 2000 characters, but some impactful ones I have seen are between 200 and 300 characters in total.

Be sure to include technical skills, your interests and measurable achievements.

FEATURED

This is a newer section on LinkedIn and it can be used to showcase your special projects, personal website, well written article and or video assets.

This is a great place to show external links off of LinkedIn and it can show your expertise to potential employers.

Try to be strategic with this, your profile should leave a good impression in all areas and you can also use keywords on this section of the profile.

The reason for this section is to permanently showcase a piece of content you might want your profile visitors to see as soon as they land on your page, as you create content on the platform it can bury things on the timeline, giving them a feature space can help your visitors land where you want them to.

REFERENCES

Lastly we have the references in your profile, they help you build credibility with your audience and page visitors. They highlight your abilities and are a great way to showcase the more personal side of you as a working professional.

Employers like to hire people they can trust, and although the references will not be the all be all in the job searching game, they can help you show a proven track record of your reliability and commitment to the job.

Since you will be asking someone to write a recommendation for you, it is best practice to give them a heads up regarding the message you will send through LinkedIn, refresh their memory on the projects you worked on and what role you played.

I certainly hope this post helps you make an impactful LinkedIn profile of your own. Go out there and start to WOW anyone and everyone who lands on your profile. Be sure to share with a friend or colleague who might be interested, sharing is caring.

Let me know your thoughts about LinkedIn below, do you find value in it?

******
Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Job Search

5 Hacks to Help You Do Better in Your Interview

When interview day arrives, most of us are feeling pretty nervous. We want to do well and impress the hiring managers so that we can get a job offer. But how exactly do you prepare for an interview? How much time should I spend preparing beforehand? Are there any questions I should ask or be prepared to answer on the day of the interview? How early should I arrive?

All these questions are rushing through your mind, especially if this is your first interview after college or the first one in a few years.

As a recruiter, Human Resources Manager, and hiring manager, I have had the pleasure of interviewing hundreds, if not thousands of candidates. And I have also been a job seeker myself, so I have been in tons of interviews as well, so I know the feeling.

Here is a little secret, the person interviewing you is most likely nervous also, so keep that in mind when you are in the interview process.

But you know what, you are in the interview stage, which many job seekers do have the opportunity even to get, so be grateful, but most importantly, be proud of yourself for being here.

You did the hard part: apply and get your resume seen and be invited for an interview so the company can see what a great candidate you are and why you should be hired.

For many, the interview process can be long, unpredictable, and nerve-wracking. That is why I decided to put some of my best hacks to help you nail the job interview and get hired. BECAUSE YOU DESERVE A JOB YOU LOVE!

In this blog post, we will discuss 5 hacks that will help you do better in your interview!

Hack #01: Be prepared for common interview questions.

One thing that all interviews have in common is that they will be asking a series of generic questions.

The reason why employers do this is to have a better metric to compare candidates, they ask the same questions and evaluate the candidacy by the answers the job seeker gives.

This gives you an advantage over other candidates who wing it, although these interviewers use the same old questions, they all have reasons to ask these, and most are looking for specific answers.

You can read more about those questions on the 15 Most Commonly Asked Interview Questions, there you will be able to prepare ahead of time for your job interview BUT you will also learn the reason behind why those questions are asked.

Not knowing how to answer these questions could leave the wrong impression, they might hurt you more than you think and can cost you the job. So be sure to read that blog post to ensure you understand and are able to answer those questions confidently.

Hack #02: Do your homework on the interviewers! Research, research, research.

Researching each of the interviewers will give you a better foot of what unique questions to ask the person interviewing you, and they love when people learn about their background also.

The easiest way to do this is to go to LinkedIn and look them up. Pay close attention to their career path, progression, and trajectory throughout companies and roles. See if they post or engage with content on LinkedIn, if they do have them see your name, engage with them as well.

You also need to research the company, what they do, who their clients are, if they have been in the news lately, and what type of voice they use for marketing, values, and mission.

Knowing the answers to these questions can help you better appeal to them because you will know how they make money, what language they use and what they value the most.

Candidates who are prepared with this type of research tend to move on to the following rounds of the interview process.

Hack #03: Practice your interview skills

I have personally found that practicing interview skills with friends is the best way to prepare for an interview and learn what you may need more work on (speaking, answering questions confidently, giving results-oriented examples, etc.).

Here are some rapid-fire tips on how to prepare and things to look out for to make you appear more professional and confident (hey we are all faking it over here)

  • Speak in a conversational tone instead of a monotone when speaking about your experience or knowledge.
  • Try to keep eye contact as best you can, those who engage with eye contact are perceived as trustworthy and more confident.
  • Make sure you talk about specific results that your experience has led to and tie those results to the job description.
  • Practice interview skills with friends and family members who can provide reliable feedback on what they liked or didn’t like so much when talking to them.

The hiring manager will be assessing your presentation skills, eye contact, and how articulate you are. They also might have a certain way they want you to answer interview questions so it is best to research what they’re looking for on their website or in the job description before the interview, so don’t be caught off guard.

Hack #04: Show up on time, smile, and bring a copy of your resume!

OK! That is three hacks in one, but why not?

Smile

Keeping a smile throughout the interview will not only make you feel more confident, but interviewers will also like you more and think of you as a friendlier person.

I know it sounds weird, but a huge part of doing well in interviews is having the person who is interviewing you LIKE YOU!!! It sounds unfair, but that is how humans operate.

Be on time

I mean 10-15 minutes prior to your scheduled interview, because if you are on time, you are late!

10-15 minutes is a good range because it gives you time to relax and catch your breath from taking the subway, or walking there. The person receiving you might give you water or offer to place you at the location of the interview.

That is helpful because you can familiarize yourself with the space.

Anything earlier than that could be annoying, because the interviewer might feel obligated to entertain you.

Bring a copy of your resume

Yes, they already have it, yes they probably printed it out, but I have always brought one with me and the interviewer has always appreciated it.

All you are doing is stacking the odds in your favor by doing subtle things that are going to leave a positive impression on the interviewer.

This can also be helpful for you to refer back to certain questions that come up during your job interview.

Hack #05: Google Sheet and Job Description Hack

This one’s my favorite and probably the juiciest one. I am sure you probably have not heard of this hack anywhere else.

This hack has helped me land four job offers in the span of four weeks.

  1. Go to the job description (I recommend you save a copy for yourself since the job might be taken down before a decision is made about the candidate selected)
  2. Take a look at the responsibilities and qualifications and paste them into a google sheet
  3. Make three columns on that sheet (one labeled “responsibilities”, another “questions”, and lastly “answers”
  4. On the “questions” column create behavioral questions around the responsibilities. For example: “tell me about a time when you had to deal with a demanding co-worker, how did you handle that situation, and what was the outcome?”
  5. Answer with a relevant example of your past experience and link it directly to the job description

And voila, you have got yourself the best cheat sheet you can imagine. You prepare yourself for potential curve balls and ensure you can answer anything related to the job you are interviewing for.

And those are some of the top hacks I can share with you that will for sure help you do well on your interview.
I hope these hacks help you excel in your interview. Good luck!

Be sure to share your hacks, questions and comments about this topic or careers in general below.

****

Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Job Search

How to Answer “Tell Me About Yourself?”

You got the interview, congratulations! You have gotten to the place where many only dream to be in.

So celebrate with your favorite beverage. No, but seriously, this is a big deal, so treat it as such.

I am sure you are here because you’d like to nail your interview, and for that I commend you as well. It is so important to be prepared for any interview.

And even seemingly simple questions like “tell me about yourself” can be tricky to answer the right way.

How hard can it be, you just need to tell the interviewer who you are and what you do?

Well it is not that simple, unfortunately, this question has gotten so much buzz, because 9 out 10 interviews will ask it.

Candidates believe it is boring, annoying and overused. While I do not disagree, it is mainly used because it is a great way to break the ice when you are first meeting someone for an interview.

And it helps the candidate feel comfortable because, I mean, who does not like to talk about themselves.

BUT there is a formula, actually there are many great ways to answer this question.

As a recruiter and hiring manager, here are the main things I look for in a candidate when they answer:

  • Ability to explain who they are in 90 seconds or less
  • Understanding of the role they are applying for by connecting themselves and their experiences to the requirements of the job
  • The impact you had in previous role with your experience that could be directly related to the role you are applying to now

Simple enough right?

OK, so you are in for a treat because I will share my very answer when it comes to winning over the recruiter or hiring manager in the interviews when I am in the candidate seat.

But let’s break the formula down first.

I break mine down into four steps:

  • How I got into the field and how it relates to my personality OR lead with demonstrating value
  • Between two and three strengths I already possess that are required for the job
  • I then add the value that those strengths resulted in
  • Tie it all together with a specific scenario or story from work (people remember stories)

The key to this formula is to review the job description thoroughly and highlight the skills and strengths that you know you have and think of examples from your experience.

Let’s pick between two and three strengths or skills the company wants you to have and start writing. (these are usually the soft skills)

Yes! I recommend you write down your answer, rehearse it so that when you are ready to deliver it at the interview you can sound natural and confident.

SAMPLE STRENGTHS:

  • Relationship building
  • Problem-Solving
  • Attention to detail

Let’s say this was for a project manager role and those strengths above were the ones you possessed and are the main reasons why you are or will be successful and a great candidate for the role.

SAMPLE FOR EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS:

“I am so excited to share the main highlights of my past 5 years experience as a project manager and how it ties into this role. Based on what I know about “XYZ company” I can see how my relationship building skills will go hand in hand with your mission to always put the client first. The best way to describe what I do is by talking about the top three things I do best in my role [include the skills from the role]. And those skills were really put to the test when [give a concrete example of a previous project you had to use some or all skills].

After a few hiccups I was able to [provide results of your work and how that helped/impacted the company]. And what I learned from that experience was [tell them one main takeaway from that project] which makes me super excited to take on the challenge and exciting opportunity that this role will have to offer.”

SAMPLE FOR NEW GRADS OR NO EXPERIENCE CANDIDATES:

“Yes of course it will be my pleasure, I moved to NYC to obtain my Bachelors in Business Administration. I chose New York because it is the heart of small, medium and larger businesses. That was really attractive to me and it clicked with my fast paced and multi faceted personality. I did a number of internships in places like AIG, Google, and JP Morgan.

I really enjoyed my time there because I built the best relationships and learned a ton about the project management industry from a lens of client, researcher, and executor. What I loved the most about those experiences was that it gave me the opportunity to realize that I was made to be a project manager. I have always been fascinated by the ability to take a small idea and build it into something that can have great impact for a company like yours [mention a specific project that company achieved and why you loved that one], I know you company is one of the leading in the industry and just sitting here with you today is a huge honor. I am so excited to learn more about potential opportunities.”

The main takeaway from the recent graduate example is that you are talking about your personality and how it relates to the job, meaning that you already have the soft skills that can’t be taught.

You also mentioned a specific project example which makes you shine because it means you did your research and believe many don’t do that.

Now that you know how to answer the question, let’s break down some of the big mistakes I have seen when asking candidates this question:

  • Remember to keep it professional, try your best to not talk about your personal life. In some special circumstances, this is necessary but it should not be the main focus of your answer.
  • Don’t walk the interviewer through your experience of what is already in your resume
  • Match the interviewer’s body language and try to be at their level of energy
  • Don’t be too self-centered

WOW, you did it, you have really done the right thing by coming here, reading and preparing yourself to nail your interview by starting with the idea on how to answer the very first question you might get asked.

This is one of the questions that really can be answered in many different ways, I recommend you read on other resources so that you can have a more robust idea on how you could make the answer your own.

This blog post has hopefully helped you be prepared to answer one of the most common questions “tell me about yourself”

Now, go get them and remember you are awesome, deserving and capable to get the offer.

Please be sure to comment below if this helped you and how your interview process is going. I would love to hear from you.

******
Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Chances Are, First-Generational Professionals Are Making This Crucial Mistake on Their Resume

As the first one in your family to attend college or pursue a professional career in the United States, first-generation professionals often face unique challenges in the workplace. One of the biggest challenges is not highlighting their accomplishments on their resume. This mistake can have a significant impact on their job search, salary, and may even cost them their dream job.

The good news is that first-generation professionals can take steps to avoid this mistake and improve their chances of success.

One important step is to reflect on their accomplishments and list all relevant skills and experiences. This may include part-time jobs, volunteer work, internships, interests, or activities.

It’s also essential to use strong action verbs and specific examples to describe these accomplishments. Hiring managers want to see concrete evidence of your skills and experience, so make sure your resume showcases your achievements in a clear and compelling way.

PROTIP: Getting feedback from others can be incredibly helpful. Ask a trusted friend, family member, or career counselor to review your resume and provide feedback. They may be able to offer valuable insights and suggestions for improvement.

Another key tip is to use keywords tailored to each job you apply for. Many companies use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to scan resumes for specific keywords that match the job description. Make sure to include relevant keywords to increase your chances of making it through the initial screening process.

Finally, it’s crucial to tailor your resume to each job you apply for. This means highlighting the skills and experience that are most relevant to the position. A one-size-fits-all approach simply won’t cut it in today’s competitive job market.

First-generation professionals must recognize the value of their accomplishments and take steps to showcase them on their resumes. By following these tips, you can avoid the common mistake of underestimating your achievements and increase your chances of landing your dream job in a few months!

******

Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Career Management

Everything You Need to Know about Job-Hopping the Right Way

Job hopping can be a strategic move for your career, but it’s important to do it the right way. Whether you’re looking for a new challenge, a better salary, or a step towards your long-term goals, it’s crucial to approach job hopping with research, honesty, and patience.

Here are some tips for job hopping the right way –

Do Your Research: Before you commit to leaving your current job, it is important that you do your due diligence and research the company you are thinking of joining. Understanding the company’s culture, the duties associated with the role, and the salary range are essential components of making an informed decision.

Be Honest About Your Reasons for Leaving: It is crucial to be completely truthful with yourself while evaluating why you wish to depart from your current job. Gaining a clear understanding of your motives for leaving will greatly assist you in securing your ideal job that aligns with your goals and provides a suitable fit tailored to your personal and professional needs.

Be Prepared to Answer Questions About Your Job Hopping: Hiring managers will likely ask you about your job hopping history. Be prepared to answer these questions honestly and in a way that highlights your positive qualities.

Be Intentional When Making Career Moves: It is important to be strategic when making decisions about changing jobs; rather than simply jumping from one job to the next, ensure that each move you make is part of a larger plan for your career growth and success. Taking the time to carefully review the potential opportunities of any new job and how it fits into your long-term goals can help you make better decisions about job hopping and ensure that each position will contribute positively to your professional development.

Don’t Burn Bridges: Even if you’re unhappy with your current job, it’s important to leave on good terms. This means giving your employer plenty of notice and leaving your work in good order. You never know when you might need to use your current employer as a reference.

Be Patient: Before you make the decision to part ways with your current job, it is essential that you do your due diligence. Take time to research the company you are interested in joining, and gain an understanding of their corporate culture, the position for which you are applying, and the salary range that goes along with it. Finding a new job takes patience and effort; remain steadfast in your hunt and keep sight of your long-term career aspirations.

Job hopping can be a great way to advance your career, but it should be approached with caution and careful consideration. By following these tips, you can increase your chances of success and find the right job that’s a good fit for you.

Good luck in your job search! Go get ’em

*****

Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Job Search

How to Follow Up After a Job Interview

Job searching can be one of the most daunting tasks we take on in our lives, waiting is the key of the game.

Thinking we might annoy the hiring manager or recruiter keeps us from following up or even sending a thank you note.

I have also heard that some job seekers don’t like to follow up because they don’t want to look “desperate”.

But the reality is that recruiters and hiring managers are super busy with their day to day, and see potentially hundreds of people in the span of q week.

It is hard to remember every single detail of interviews when you are the one interviewing.

This makes it even more difficult for you to stand out as a candidate.

Yes, it sounds like a “they problem” BUT if you want the job you have to go the extra mile, play the game a little bit by sending an impactful and memorable message as a tactic to follow up.

This post is all about how to effectively follow up after a job interview.

This is a guide on the biggest mistakes you should avoid and best practices when it comes to sending that “I just wanted to follow up on our conversation regarding position X” email.

It is extremely frustrating to interview for a role you are excited about and weeks have passed and you have not heard back.

This is not an indication you did not get it, it could mean many different things: the hiring team is not able to make a unanimous decision, they are on vacation and their schedules are not in line with finalizing the process.

It could also mean the hiring team still meeting all viable and qualified candidates, this can take longer than anticipated because it all depends on the schedule availability of multiple people.

The best way to keep top of mind is by following up with the team, reminding them why you are the candidate they want.

You can simply do this by always letting them know your key skills and expertise as it relates to the job description.

First things first, in order to stand out and make the follow up message worth your time and the hiring manager’s, it is important to avoid these major mistakes I see almost every day.

EXPECTING SOMETHING

It is important to manage your expectations when it comes to emailing hiring managers and recruiters.

Farming your message in a way that is curious with a tone of friendly reminder AND not expecting a response tends to be more successful messages.

Instead of saying: “please respond with an approximate timeline” you can say “looking forward to having the opportunity of continuing in the process”.

I know it pisses people off having to dance around the bushes and some even say “why can’t I just be who I am”, instead of trying to be “polite”. I agree to some degree, but remember you have to play the game in order to beat the system and get the job.

SENDING LENGTHY EMAILS

Again, we are so busy and getting tons of emails, so it is important to be succinct and straight to the point of the note (which is simply reminding them of your interest and skills)

It is OK to attach your resume for reference, but try not attach a portfolio, cover letter, unless it was specifically requested.

The email should not be more than 3-5 paragraphs and each paragraph should contain no more than three sentences.

NOT PERSONALIZING IT

There are great templates online for thank you letters, however they have been overused and that makes them lose their uniqueness and touch.

I will share some samples BUT very genetic ones, because the point is to give you a reference point to get you started.

YOU should absolutely make it your own and what will make a thank you note successful is referencing something specifically talked about in the meeting.

I have done this with conversations I have had regarding the company’s values, a joke someone told, an article or book mentioned.

This is cool because it demonstrates that you were paying attention and have good active listening skills.

Now, on to what you should do to have your follow up note be successful

There are multiple ways to send a good follow up note and they are different stages.

The first one is usually a THANK YOU note right after the interview.
Some hiring managers really do not care if you send one or not.

BUT many recruiters I have spoken to and some polls I have done on LinkedIn indicate that the majority of the decision makers in the hiring process like to receive thank you notes.

They are not as common as you think, so when you send one it should be one to remember.

THE THANK YOU NOTE

The main characteristics for a successful thank you note are:

  • Brief and friendly
  • Make your interest for the role clear
  • Add potential info you might have forgotten to mention on the interview

Hello [hiring manager OR recruiter],

Thank you for meeting with me today. After learning more about the [position title], I’m very excited for the opportunity to join your team and contribute [ increase revenue, bring innovative ideas for upcoming marketing campaigns, etc.] for [Company Name].

I am confident that with my X years of experience of working on [product development, copywriting, sales, marketing, etc.] would greatly benefit [Company Name].

Our discussion about [Challenge discussed] an idea came to mind. Has the [Marketing] team considered trying [process, tactic, etc]? I found it to be an effective process in my last role.
Please keep me posted on the status of the hiring process. I look forward to speaking with you soon.

Best,
[Your Name]

The reason why this works is because it is short, very much tailor to remind the person who interviewed you who you are and why you should be considered for the position.

The key to successful follow up is to remain calm, curious but not pushy or desperate.

I certainly hope this post provided you with some insights on how to follow up after a job interview, and the importance of following up after an interview.

Let me know if you have any questions below.

This post was all about how to follow up after a job interview, and what thank you note to send after a job interview.

******
Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Job Search

How to Write a Resume That Gets the Interview In 2023

Have you ever been tempted to buy a resume template off of Etsy? Or maybe go to Canva to get a resume template for that job you want?

No worries, all of us at some point have thought of doing both, I know I did when I was first starting and I did not know a thing about the job search or what a resume was.

Well, since it was brought up…

What is a resume?

According to Investopedia, a resume is a document that job applicants use to summarize their work experience, educational background, and special skills.

It technically tells the prospective employer if you are qualified for the job and if you are on your resume when you will hopefully be invited into a job interview.

Here is the thing: the reason why Etsy and Canva were brought up so early on in this blog post is that your resume does not need to be pretty, it needs to be effective.

It needs to get the job done to land you interviews.

If you are ready to learn how to write a resume that gets you hired, you are in the right place.

If you are like any other traditional job applicant and are using an online forum to find jobs, a resume will undoubtedly be the most important document you will have to write to get you started in the job searching process.

A well-written resume needs to highlight the most relevant and impressive qualities, accomplishments, impact, and qualifications to be considered for an interview.

Before we continue, I have to add that this post is specifically to address the job search process in the US, resumes are different in different areas of the world. And this is also to answer directly to those wanting to break into corporate America.

Here is what you will learn after reading this guide:

  • How to quantify your accomplishments using the famous “Google’s XYZ” formula
  • Ensure your resume is going to be “ATS friendly” with the keyword and phrases needed to stand out
  • Learn what important experience needs to be included in your resume
  • How to craft an excellent highlight section to wow the recruiters after only 5 seconds
  • What type of skills should you add to your resume

First things first, let’s chat about the main components of your resume (aside from the contact information the order in which you choose to place these components in your resume will depend on your level of experience and seniority or stage you are in your career, i.e. industry changes, graduation recency, relevant experience, etc.)

Contact information – this should be the first thing the recruiter sees and it needs to have the following information:

  • Full name
  • Contact information (email, phone number, LinkedIn URL)
  • City of residence

Education – This is for those who have an education at any level, certifications, or any professional training attained in a formal education setting. If you are a recent graduate (3yrs or less) you should have this at the top of the resume right after your contact information.

Here you should include the name of the institution, area of study, and special recognitions. If you’d like, you can keep the graduation date off your resume because that can tend to age discrimination.

Executive Summary – this is optional, but it can be impactful for those with more experience, looking to change industries or careers, and would like to highlight. Studies have shown that the first thing the recruiter’s eye catches is the top center part of the resume, which happens to be where the summary would be. This section (if you decide to use it) needs to show your most valuable and recent career accomplishments. Keep it between 2-4 sentences. Make sure it clearly states the results you have provided a company with your skill set.

Professional Experience – Relevant job experience is the meat and potatoes of your resume, and it is arguably the part that gets you the attention you need to land a job interview. So this is going to be especially important that you get it right. This section should be listed in chronological order and be sure to have the bullets listed in the order of importance.

Most job descriptions list their duties with the top 3-5 being the most important responsibilities that the hiring manager considers to be the most critical. You want the resume to reflect the same. Stay away from listing tasks, you should concentrate on providing a results-driven overview. This section needs to also show the impact you have had while performing your duties at work, and the way you can do that is by providing data and metrics that can be easily measured.

Now, I might have gotten lost there, but this is where the easy XYZ formula comes in handy. This is a formula that was created and revealed by Google, you can read the article by visiting careers.google.com/how-we-hire

Essentially, they say this: “Be specific about projects you’ve worked on or managed. What was the outcome? How did you measure success? When in doubt, lean on the formula, “accomplished [X] as measured by [Y], by doing [Z].”

My rule of thumb is that if you can’t formulate your bullet like this one you need to start over. Don’t leave any of your experiences to chance. This is the exact formula I use to coach my clients and the one that helped me land a job in a FAANG company. So it WORKS!!!!

Skills – Competencies and technical skills should go hand-in-hand with your executive summary. Expertise and knowledge can be shown here in a bullet point format.

For example:

  • Employee Relations
  • Change management
  • ADP payroll
  • Python, Javascript

Be sure to correlate these to match the job posting’s keywords. Remember that often the recruiter is specifically looking for those hard skills first before assessing if they should call you for a job interview. Therefore, you need to be vigilant about this piece just like you were in your experience section.

Languages/Accomplishments – this is also going to be on an individual basis and will also be your choice. Accomplishments can be a powerful way to showcase a good review you received from your manager OR an excellent opportunity to highlight the project you are the proudest of. Languages can also be impactful and should always be included if the role requires it. Note that if you are stating that you are proficient in a particular language the interviewer might ask you to demonstrate it, so ensure you can hold a professional conversation in that language.

Now that you have the main components of a basic resume

Rapid Fire Must Do – Here are some useful and simple things you should add or have in your resume for ultimate results:

  • Add facts and data (quantify your accomplishments) *go back to the XYZ formula
  • Use consistent format by using the same fonts and layout throughout
  • Use chronological order for your experience
  • If you get stuck or have issues coming up with metrics or examples that show impact, you can try thinking back on your professional experience, and use the STAR method when writing out projects or what I like to call “career stories”
    • S – situation
    • T – task at hand
    • A – action taken
    • R – results

Now, let’s talk about what not to include in your resume. It is important to know what to add to your resume but it is also important to understand the things that might be outdated and or unnecessary to add to your resume.

  1. Your full address – is not a necessary part of your resume. Also, think of the privacy issues; when you are sending your resume to strangers on the internet you don’t want them to have your full address.
  2. Objective statements – are also super outdated because they technically do not add any value to your resume. It only points to things you wish to obtain, which is great but it does not increase your chances of getting a job just because you are saying you want it.
  3. Soft skills – this is probably one of the most continuous offenses I see on resumes, and it is not that they are not valuable, but leaving them in your resume as a one-off does not provide the impact you have had in your role. There are ways to implement soft skills in your resume that say you are a “team player” without having to type those words exactly. Here is an example of what a bullet point would look like if you were to want to showcase you were a team player:
    • Managed and coordinated 5 revenue impact projects while working cross-functionally with 8 different departments
  4. Spelling and grammar – you want to ensure you leave a good impression, your resume is your first chance to do that. If you send in a resume that has grammatical errors or mistakes, that will make you look like you are careless or not very good at attention to detail. This is why I advise my clients to be strategic with their search, because the fewer yet more strategic jobs you apply for, the more time you have to be intentional leaving the least room for error.
  5. References upon request – this is another outdated resume practice that should be removed. Recruiters and hiring managers assume you will give them references if they request. Keep in mind that a lot of companies are moving away from requiring references because you are likely to provide someone that could only write positive things about you, for good reason, and so the data they obtain turns out to not be as valuable or useful. Remember your resume is precious real estate and you should treat it as such.
  6. Using passive language – Be sure to use action verbs instead of passive language in your resume. I tend to use a lot of passive verbs because I am bilingual, and while I translate things in my head as I write them, they often do come off that way. Don’t worry, in this guide I have also included a list of action verbs you can use in case you need inspiration.

RAPID FIRE mistakes to avoid

Poor attention to detail – mistakes, typos, grammatical errors, etc.
How to combat that: my biggest advice here is to have different people take a look at your resume and ask them to spell check your resume.

Too long of a resume – yes, the length should not matter, but we have a problem when applicants send out 10pg resumes.
How to combat that: only leave the most relevant information/experience in the resume that will answer directly to the role you are applying to. Decrease the margins and use smaller fonts.

Now, the moment you have been waiting for, here is a sneak peek of the resume template you will get, all you have to do is download it using this link, be sure to make a copy before you make any changes.

What frustrates you the most about writing resumes? What do you wish to know about the hiring process? Ask away in the comments below.

There is also a handy guide attached when you download the resume.

Best of luck in your job search, you got this!!!!!

I hope this blog post serves you well, it talked about the tips on how to write a resume, and it also explained what is a resume, with this post you will be able to learn how to write a resume for the first time, and most importantly it covered resume writing tips and samples.

******
Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Career Management

5 Key Strategies to Negotiate Your Salary Like a Boss

Ready to step up and negotiate your salary like a pro? Today, I’m sharing with you five key tips that’ll help you get the paycheck you deserve. With these tricks up your sleeves, you’ll walk into salary negotiation interviews feeling confident to advocate for yourself. Let’s dive in!

Strategy #1: Do your research. Before going into a negotiation, it’s important to know what you’re worth. Look up average salaries for your position in your industry, and use that information to set your expectations. Research can be done through online searches, talking to peers, or even using specialized tools. Knowing what the average salary is for your position in your industry is essential when assessing your worth.

Strategy #2: Be confident. It’s easy to feel intimidated when negotiating your salary, but remember that you have the power to advocate for yourself. Confidence is also a key factor in salary negotiation. Remember that you are negotiating for what you are worth, not asking for a favor. Believe in your abilities, your worth, and your contributions to the company so that you can be prepared to ask for what you deserve.

Strategy #3: Be prepared to walk away. If you’re not happy with the offer, don’t be afraid to walk away. This doesn’t mean being confrontational, it simply means recognizing your own value and refusing to settle for less. Being prepared to walk away is another strategy that can be difficult, yet powerful. Although it’s important to be confident, it’s equally as important to know when to walk away if the offer is not what you are looking for. Be respectful and courteous, explaining your reasoning for your decision. This can be a significant moment in your career, where you know your worth and take a stand.

Strategy #4: Be flexible. Negotiation is a two-way street, so be willing to negotiate on things like benefits, vacation time, or even job responsibilities. Find a compromise that works for both you and your employer. Keep in mind to negotiate on certain aspects, such as additional benefits like health insurance or vacation time. The goal is to reach a salary agreement that is mutually beneficial to both the employee and employer.

Strategy #5: Be professional. No matter how the negotiation goes, it’s important to maintain a professional demeanor. This means being punctual, respectful, and avoiding personal attacks or threats. Avoid personal attacks or threats, and don’t burn any bridges in the process. Remember, the negotiation process can be a conversation, so stay open-minded and maintain a positive attitude.

By following these five key strategies, you can negotiate your salary with confidence and assertiveness like a boss. Remember to do your research, be confident, be flexible, be prepared to walk away, and maintain professionalism throughout the process.

So what are you waiting for? Start negotiating today!

******
Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Career Management

Ready for a Promotion? Here’s How You Can Prepare!

Congratulations! If you’re ready for a promotion, you’ve already taken the first step toward advocating for yourself to receive a new and exciting career path. However, prior to aspiring for a higher-level position, here are a few things you should know.

First, it’s important to develop the skills necessary for the position you want. This might mean taking additional classes, attending workshops, or getting certified in a relevant area. The more you can demonstrate your expertise and knowledge, the better chance you’ll have of being promoted.

Networking is also key. Meet people who work in your field, attend industry events, and connect with colleagues on LinkedIn. By building relationships with others, you’ll be more likely to hear about new opportunities or get a referral from someone in the industry.

But it’s not just about who you know – it’s also about how well you perform. Be a high performer by constantly meeting or exceeding expectations, going above and beyond, and being a team player. If you can consistently deliver great work and help others succeed, you’ll be on the fast track to a promotion.

Of course, it’s important to be patient. Getting a promotion takes time and effort, and it’s not always going to happen right away. But if you keep working hard and demonstrating your value to the company, you’ll be rewarded for your efforts eventually.

At the same time, it’s important to know when the right opportunity presents itself. If there’s not enough room for growth in your current role, or if the organization isn’t able to support your ambitions, then a promotion might not make sense at this time. By recognizing these signs, you can make smart business decisions and position yourself for success in the future.

So, are you ready for a promotion? If so, start preparing today by developing your skills, networking, and being a high-performing team player. With a bit of patience and perseverance, you’ll be well on your way to a new and exciting career opportunity. Good luck!

Want more advice on how to prepare for your next conversation with a job recruiter?
Listen to the Top Chart Careers Podcast: Careers In Review 

******
Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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Job Search

3 Shocking Things You Should Have Ready for a Job Interview

Hey there! If you’re gearing up for a job interview, there are a few surprising things you should have ready to increase your chances of success. Of course, being prepared is key when it comes to job interviews. So, let’s dive into 3 things that you may not have thought about before.

Don’t be afraid to discuss your salary requirements during the interview. Many job seekers are hesitant to bring this up, but it’s important for hiring managers to know so they can make you an offer that suits your needs. Instead of waiting for them to ask, you can tactfully bring up the topic by asking about the salary range for the position or sharing your expectations after being offered the job.

It’s not just about answering the interviewer’s questions. It’s also important to have some questions of your own. This shows that you’re interested and engaged, and it can help you learn more about the company culture and the job itself. Consider asking about the company’s goals, biggest challenges, opportunities for advancement, or company culture, for example.

It’s always a good idea to have a backup plan in case you don’t get the job you’re interviewing for. This can help you stay positive and motivated during your job search process. Networking, taking on freelance work or contract work, or even starting your own business could be good starting points for developing a backup plan. It will also give you something to fall back on if you don’t get the job you want.

Some ideas for backup plans include:

  • Networking with people in your field
  • Taking on freelance or contract work
  • Starting your own business

So, there you have it! Try to keep these shocking things in mind as you prepare for your next job interview.

Good luck out there! Go get ’em.

****

Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.

DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.

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Job Search

Job Screening Interview: Has Anyone Ever Told You About These 4 Things?

Picture this –you’re applying for a job and have been invited to a screening interview. First off, congratulations! This is an important step towards landing your dream job. However, what do you do to prepare for the actual job screening interview?

So wait, hold up! What exactly do recruiters mean when they say a “job screening interview?”

A screening interview is usually the first interview in the hiring process. Typically, these interviews are brief (15-30 minutes) and are conducted over the phone or video conferencing. The interviewer will ask a few basic questions to gauge your qualifications and experience. They may also inquire about your salary expectations, availability, and work preferences. Generally, the interviewer is looking for specific skills and achievements as they relate to the job requirements.

It’s purpose is to shortlist candidates for further interviews by assessing 3 things —your

  • Qualifications
  • Experience
  • and personality

Employers conduct screening interviews to save time and resources by filtering out unsuitable candidates from a large pool of applicants.

Screening interviews give you the opportunity to present yourself as a capable and confident candidate. If you impress the interviewer in the screening interview, you are more likely to be called for subsequent rounds of interviews. It’ll also help you understand the job requirements, company culture, and work environment.

Now, let’s talk about the four things you should know about screening interviews.

Be Prepared: Research the company, its products or services, and the job description. Practice answering common interview questions in advance. Secondly, be professional. Dress appropriately, arrive on time, and be courteous and respectful to the interviewer. Also, don’t forget to practice answering some common interview questions to ensure that you’re ready for anything they throw at you. Remember, the screening interview is your chance to make a good first impression.

Be Professional: You need to present yourself in a professional manner during your screening interview. Dress appropriately even if it’s a virtual meeting, arrive on time, and be polite and respectful to the interviewer. Also, silence your phone, and eliminate all the distractions and background noises.

Be Positive: It’s crucial to come across as optimistic and enthusiastic in your screening interview. Smile, make eye contact, and exude confidence. Your attitude and demeanor can make a huge difference in how you come across to the interviewer.

Ask Questions: Don’t be afraid to ask questions that show your interest in the position and the company. But, remember to ask thoughtful and relevant questions to avoid coming across as unprepared. Prepare a list of questions before your interview, and be sure to ask them. This is your opportunity to learn more about the job and the company.

Screening interviews are the perfect opportunity to make a good first impression. By implementing the above tips, you’ll be well on your way to acing your next screening interview. Remember to be clear and concise in your answers, avoid going off on tangents, project enthusiasm, and let your personality shine through.

Good luck! Go get ’em!

*****

Please note that all topics discussed are my opinion and not based on my current or past employers. This is not a call to discuss job opportunities at my employer and does not guarantee job placement.
DISCLAIMER: Please note I do not offer any career coaching services or interview prep to those seeking jobs in the Tech industry.
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There are people applying for jobs you want and they far less qualified than you! 

Be delulu! Apply to the job! 

There are far less competent men asking for the raise.

Be delulu, ask for more! 

No one thought going to the moon was a sane idea until it happened.

This time next will look so different, you have to show up, take action and claim it as your
But you also need the data to back it up!

And if you need help with that part, comment “VIP” and I’ll send you the sign up info on your DMs this waitlist is pumped up and you don’t want to miss out for what’s coming in the 2024!!! 

#careeradvice #jobsearching

There are people applying for jobs you want and they far less qualified than you!

Be delulu! Apply to the job!

There are far less competent men asking for the raise.

Be delulu, ask for more!

No one thought going to the moon was a sane idea until it happened.

This time next will look so different, you have to show up, take action and claim it as your
But you also need the data to back it up!

And if you need help with that part, comment “VIP” and I’ll send you the sign up info on your DMs this waitlist is pumped up and you don’t want to miss out for what’s coming in the 2024!!!

#careeradvice #jobsearching
...

@careersinreview comment “VIP” and you’ll be added to the waiting list for the salary negotiation and script guide that I’m releasing in January. 

“Thank you so much for for the offer. I’m excited about this role, the team and the company. The base salary is lower than expected/originally discussed, and based on the years of experience I bring on [specify on area tie it to the role skills] I’d like to reanchor the conversation that I’m looking for a number closer to XYZ, I’m very interested in the role and would like to know how we can work together to get us closer to this number.” 

The best way to have leverage during these conversations is to have other options lined up. 

Practice before you have this conversation. 

Consider other compensation aside the base salary. 

Salary conversations are one of my favorite topics. Drop your questions below 👇🏼 

#salarynegotiation #salary #careeradvice

@careersinreview comment “VIP” and you’ll be added to the waiting list for the salary negotiation and script guide that I’m releasing in January.

“Thank you so much for for the offer. I’m excited about this role, the team and the company. The base salary is lower than expected/originally discussed, and based on the years of experience I bring on [specify on area tie it to the role skills] I’d like to reanchor the conversation that I’m looking for a number closer to XYZ, I’m very interested in the role and would like to know how we can work together to get us closer to this number.”

The best way to have leverage during these conversations is to have other options lined up.

Practice before you have this conversation.

Consider other compensation aside the base salary.

Salary conversations are one of my favorite topics. Drop your questions below 👇🏼

#salarynegotiation #salary #careeradvice
...

@careersinreview Comment “VIP” to be added to the waitlist for the resources I’ll be launching in early 2024 all FREE.99 that will help you with of this. 

Also what am I typing 🤣 

#careers #careertips #careerhelp #careeradvice #careerdevelopment #jobsearching #jobsearching

@careersinreview Comment “VIP” to be added to the waitlist for the resources I’ll be launching in early 2024 all FREE.99 that will help you with of this.

Also what am I typing 🤣

#careers #careertips #careerhelp #careeradvice #careerdevelopment #jobsearching #jobsearching
...

@careersinreview I know your probably defeated 😔 but don’t take your foot off the gas. 

You got this! And if you need help with your search I’m here for you. 

Leave your burning question below and I’ll answer them at the end of the day. 

What are you the most excited for the holidays? ☺️

#careers #jobsearchtips

@careersinreview I know your probably defeated 😔 but don’t take your foot off the gas.

You got this! And if you need help with your search I’m here for you.

Leave your burning question below and I’ll answer them at the end of the day.

What are you the most excited for the holidays? ☺️

#careers #jobsearchtips
...

@careersinreview the secret to negotiation when it comes to your salary…

Is, there is no secret.

Those “comments” truly don’t matter. 

Could they hurt you a bit if you’re in a conversation with a really experienced recruiter? Maybe.

Sometimes good recruiters (the truly good ones) only want to know the number that will make you happy.

But the tricky part is hard for you as the job seeker to know who are the good ones. 

So I get it, let’s prepare you for the scenario where you’d get someone who might want to get you for cheaper 😣

Yes, you shouldn’t volunteer how much you currently make. 

So here is how you can safely navigate this:

🔥give a range, a big one, and take advantage of total compensation talk. 

✨it’s not all about base salary, so when you give a number and if it feels too big for you be sure to mention at the end “total compensation”

👏🏻salary negotiations are very personal because it’s going depend on how much reliable information you have and how much leverage you actually have at the time of negotiation. 

So although it doesn’t technically really matter, to be safe stay away from saying those things, come prepared, be ok with talking about money 💰 

You got this! 

I’m creating a $FREE.99 guide all things money (salary negotiation) when it comes to all milestones to your career. 

Comment “VIP” and I’ll add you to the waiting list for when that’s ready in January. 

This resource comes with 10yrs of experience negotiating salary on both sides of the table, negotiating base, benefits, titles, vacations, equity, and more. 

It’s gonna be LIT 🔥 

Drop “VIP” in the comments and you’ll be added to the waiting list.

@careersinreview the secret to negotiation when it comes to your salary…

Is, there is no secret.

Those “comments” truly don’t matter.

Could they hurt you a bit if you’re in a conversation with a really experienced recruiter? Maybe.

Sometimes good recruiters (the truly good ones) only want to know the number that will make you happy.

But the tricky part is hard for you as the job seeker to know who are the good ones.

So I get it, let’s prepare you for the scenario where you’d get someone who might want to get you for cheaper 😣

Yes, you shouldn’t volunteer how much you currently make.

So here is how you can safely navigate this:

🔥give a range, a big one, and take advantage of total compensation talk.

✨it’s not all about base salary, so when you give a number and if it feels too big for you be sure to mention at the end “total compensation”

👏🏻salary negotiations are very personal because it’s going depend on how much reliable information you have and how much leverage you actually have at the time of negotiation.

So although it doesn’t technically really matter, to be safe stay away from saying those things, come prepared, be ok with talking about money 💰

You got this!

I’m creating a $FREE.99 guide all things money (salary negotiation) when it comes to all milestones to your career.

Comment “VIP” and I’ll add you to the waiting list for when that’s ready in January.

This resource comes with 10yrs of experience negotiating salary on both sides of the table, negotiating base, benefits, titles, vacations, equity, and more.

It’s gonna be LIT 🔥

Drop “VIP” in the comments and you’ll be added to the waiting list.
...

✨the job market continues to be dumpster fire 🔥 

And the career advice I see continues to be less reliable.

The more “clickbait” and outrageous the claim the more likely it is that is not true. 

Some jobs might not make it to a job board but that would be the very minority of the cases not 80% 

Adding the job description in white font to your resume is an old trick that has now been picked up by recruiters, not a risk you should be taking. 

You can reach out to recruiters and HMs, do it strategically, apply for the role first, you need to comply with the rules. They can’t consider you if you’re not an official candidate. 

#career #careersearch #jobsearch #hiddenjobmarket #jobmarket #careersucess #careercoachingonline #careercoaching #careergoals

✨the job market continues to be dumpster fire 🔥

And the career advice I see continues to be less reliable.

The more “clickbait” and outrageous the claim the more likely it is that is not true.

Some jobs might not make it to a job board but that would be the very minority of the cases not 80%

Adding the job description in white font to your resume is an old trick that has now been picked up by recruiters, not a risk you should be taking.

You can reach out to recruiters and HMs, do it strategically, apply for the role first, you need to comply with the rules. They can’t consider you if you’re not an official candidate.

#career #careersearch #jobsearch #hiddenjobmarket #jobmarket #careersucess #careercoachingonline #careercoaching #careergoals
...

I can’t believe I’m going to say this…

But you have the right to walk away, repeat after me, you have the right to walk away!

A lot of career content creators (myself included) talk about the things you should avoid as a job seeker so you don’t show red flags to your future employer.

But what should you do when the employer is the one showing the red flags? 

Here is what you can say when you’re encounter with these scenarios:

🚩Not sharing salary after multiple attempts: “unfortunately I’m unable to continue in the process without understanding the compensation structure and salary range being offered for the role…”

🚩Illegal questions: “I rather focused on talking about the professional aspect of my background and joe my skills can serve this role…” 

🚩Lengthly projects (not compensated): “here is a sample portfolio of my work which will showcase the exact same skills and will answer the same questions as the project proposed for this project.”

🚩Exploding offer: “I understand the urgency here, I’d appreciate reasonable time to evaluate the offer in writing and review so I know I’m ma liking an educated decision”

🚩no shows or too many reschedules:”unfortunately it appears this role might not be ready to be filled at this time, I’ll be withdrawing my application from consideration.

I’m working on something super exciting to help you prep for your interviews if you want first dibs follow the instructions below. 

Comment the word “GUIDE” and I’ll send you the pdf with preliminary information, once you sign up you’ll be the first to know when the new resource come out 🤪 

#interviews #interviewtips #interviewquestions #interviewskills #interviewprep #jobinterviewquestions #jobinterviewtips #jobinterviews #jobinterview #careertipsdaily #careertalk

I can’t believe I’m going to say this…

But you have the right to walk away, repeat after me, you have the right to walk away!

A lot of career content creators (myself included) talk about the things you should avoid as a job seeker so you don’t show red flags to your future employer.

But what should you do when the employer is the one showing the red flags?

Here is what you can say when you’re encounter with these scenarios:

🚩Not sharing salary after multiple attempts: “unfortunately I’m unable to continue in the process without understanding the compensation structure and salary range being offered for the role…”

🚩Illegal questions: “I rather focused on talking about the professional aspect of my background and joe my skills can serve this role…”

🚩Lengthly projects (not compensated): “here is a sample portfolio of my work which will showcase the exact same skills and will answer the same questions as the project proposed for this project.”

🚩Exploding offer: “I understand the urgency here, I’d appreciate reasonable time to evaluate the offer in writing and review so I know I’m ma liking an educated decision”

🚩no shows or too many reschedules:”unfortunately it appears this role might not be ready to be filled at this time, I’ll be withdrawing my application from consideration.

I’m working on something super exciting to help you prep for your interviews if you want first dibs follow the instructions below.

Comment the word “GUIDE” and I’ll send you the pdf with preliminary information, once you sign up you’ll be the first to know when the new resource come out 🤪

#interviews #interviewtips #interviewquestions #interviewskills #interviewprep #jobinterviewquestions #jobinterviewtips #jobinterviews #jobinterview #careertipsdaily #careertalk
...

I know y’all don’t want to hear this, but it’s the truth.

Al is not yet the one rejecting or selecting the candidates/ resumes that will move forward.

Because the one company that tried it got sued big time and the technology is not ready for it yet, so it has not happen vet.

So please for the love of god stop believing people that have no experience in hiring, people who have never seen the back end of a hiring applicant system.

The job market is tough right now, so you might doing all the right things and still might not be seeing results, time will be the determining factor here.

#aitools #aihiring #ainews #hiringalert #hiringjobs

I know y’all don’t want to hear this, but it’s the truth.

Al is not yet the one rejecting or selecting the candidates/ resumes that will move forward.

Because the one company that tried it got sued big time and the technology is not ready for it yet, so it has not happen vet.

So please for the love of god stop believing people that have no experience in hiring, people who have never seen the back end of a hiring applicant system.

The job market is tough right now, so you might doing all the right things and still might not be seeing results, time will be the determining factor here.

#aitools #aihiring #ainews #hiringalert #hiringjobs
...

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